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Professional Conduct & Ethics in the HVAC Industry

Professional Conduct & Ethics in the HVAC Industry

Professional Conduct & Ethics in the HVAC Industry

Professional conduct and ethics sound at first like something we all know and don’t need to be told. In regards to the way we treat ourselves and fellow HVAC contractors, this is probably true. However, the definition of professional conduct and ethics needs to expand to include our treatment of customers, employers, and employees as well.

Ethical standards of treatment should apply to everyone in the HVAC industry. Potential customers and employers particularly deserve a professional contractor. While there are no established ethics and code of conduct for HVAC contractors, there are a few universal ethical principles that most people will appreciate seeing. Let’s take a closer look at what those principles are.

Professional conduct and ethics are no less important in the HVAC industry than anywhere else in life. Here’s how to maintain a professional attitude in your workday. #HVAC Click To Tweet

Helping Customers vs. Upselling

Any time money is involved, the greed factor comes to play, and with greed comes deception and dirty tricks. This is in no way exclusive to any one group.

For example, let’s say you go to work for a company that pays you a fair wage and you give them a fair day’s work for that wage. There is no reason for you to earn anything except the amount you agreed to work for. At the end of the week, you’re happy with your paycheck, your boss is happy with your work, and the customer is happy with the services you provided. This type of win-win-win situation is fairly common with many business models. However, if the business owner is only interested in sales and offers a high commission only if you sell new systems, customers are at your mercy because they truly have no idea of their options. Unfortunately, businesses focused more on selling new systems than helping people pay about triple what a truly honest business would. This is when greed sets in and businesses forget how to help customers and just sell HVAC systems. This dishonest business practice is far too common.

Pro Tip: Customers just want to make an informed decision without pressure and upselling from you as the contractor. Answer their questions honestly and help them find the best choice for their homes.

Ethical Behavior for an HVAC Contractor

Be honest with the customers and give them all the options. It’s not our job to decide what is best for them, and it’s certainly not ethical to hide options from them.

The same thing comes to being professional in our dealings with one another in the trade. HVAC techs should never feel above performing an installation, for instance. It’s all part of the job.

Red Flags to Watch For

If you notice these red flags after leaving an HVAC training program, take them as a sign of which companies to avoid:

  • No recovery or vacuum pumps and equipment on the trucks
  • No brazing with nitrogen flushing
  • Selling used refrigerant

Practices like these are why it’s so important for us as HVAC contractors to self-police our trade. These shoddy companies either need to get in compliance or out of business.

Maintaining a High Standard

Professional conduct for an HVAC contractor goes beyond simple customer service and courtesy. You must also understand exactly what your client wants and provide it, rather than trying to create more work and thus more profit for yourself. After all, a happy customer can easily become a repeat customer through ethical treatment.

Join the conversation to learn more about professional conduct and ethics for HVAC contractors.

Tire Kickers: Firing a Customer

Tire Kickers: Firing a Customer

From time to time, a business or independent contractor find themselves in the unusual position of firing a customer. This is a relatively uncommon occurrence and is usually seen as something of a strange role reversal. However, the ability to cut ties with a customer is a crucial ability to have, particularly for contractors or small business owners.

Yes, you can fire a customer and your business prosperity can depend on it. If a customer is unbearably difficult or clearly trying to take advantage of you, there’s no shame in refusing to provide services to them anymore. Ultimately, this decision will protect your sanity and your business.

How does an HVAC technician handle firing a customer? Learn how to handle this important decision here. Click To Tweet

How to Know When a Customer Needs to Be Fired

Many customers are finicky, and some are just downright hard to work with. However, it’s not impossible to work with finicky or difficult customers. After all, they still pay you just like the good customers do.

However, there are some customers who are past finicky and difficult and are impossible to work for. This customer will seek you out just to take as much as they can from you in time and expertise, but will never pay you a dime. They generally start the process by telling you how many projects they might have for you once they get this one resolved. This only thing they want is to somehow get you to fix their system for free. In the business world, these kinds of customers are known as “tire kickers”, after people who waste a car salesman’s time by kicking the tires of every car in the lot without actually buying one.

Pro Tip: Anyone who hires you for HVAC work with the promise of dozens of future jobs is just as dishonest as someone who offers to pay an artist in “exposure”. They just want free labor from you–don’t give it to them!

Firing a Customer

Learn how to identify these bad customers sooner rather than later and fire them. Usually, this is done by giving them a price and refuse to work until a check is in your hands. Other times it requires telling them you will not work for them. In extreme cases, it might just mean blocking their number and forgetting about them.

Don’t Be Fooled

Some of the persistent, impossible customers just don’t understand the concept of being fired. Train yourself to not get caught in a tire kicker’s web of promised future work. If you suspect a customer may be a tire kicker, ask for payment or a deposit upfront and see how they react. If your instincts are correct and they’re just wasting your time, fire the customer immediately. Don’t give them time to fool you anymore.

Terminating the Relationship with a Customer

As an HVAC technician, train yourself to distinguish between a difficult customer, a client having a bad day, and a tire kicker. Additionally, remember there’s no shame in refusing to offer services to a particular client because of their behavior. Just make sure you know when to cut ties with a bad customer and how to handle the situation professionally.

Connect with us to learn more about customer relations in the HVAC field.

3 Things Customers Want from an HVAC Business

3 Things Customers Want from an HVAC Business

Customers know that the best way to get a good deal on products or services is to comb the market, looking for the best company for their price. While many homeowners are concerned with getting the lowest possible price for what they want, another huge factor is the company itself that they’re considering. How do they generally treat their customers? And for an expensive yet critical part of the typical American home, the HVAC unit, homeowners are even more careful of their ultimate choice.

Customer preferences for their HVAC repair services strongly influence their ultimate choice. Do you fit the bill? Click To Tweet

Appealing to a Wide Client Base

Customers have definite preferences regarding HVAC services, ranging from price to availability. However, don’t forget the more nebulous yet equally important factors many homeowners consider as they shop for air conditioning services. A few additional preferences may include:

  1. Experience and previous work
  2. Reviews and testimonials
  3. Speedy service

1) Experience and Previous Work

Past experiences, knowledge of current HVAC technology, and records of previous work are all important to prove your competence as a trustworthy technician. Even if you haven’t been in business very long, you can boost potential clients’ confidence in you by demonstrating an intimate knowledge of their HVAC problems and how best to solve them. Show off your current knowledge as well as your previous experiences and successful jobs.

2) Reviews and Testimonials

One excellent way to provide information about your previous work is through glowing customer reviews. How many past clients are thrilled with your excellent work on their HVAC systems? How recent are their reviews? Don’t be shy about promoting good testimonies from previous clients.

3) Speedy Service

Considering how many people use their HVAC units daily, especially during the summer, timeliness is a huge factor in which technician customers will hire. If their favorite technician isn’t available for a month, whereas a less familiar one can be there in an hour, most clients will choose the faster option. By its nature, HVAC is often a time-consuming job with work showing up abruptly and with urgent need. It’s important to do your best to be open to surprise jobs without neglecting previous appointments.

Pro Tip: Once you’ve been hired by a client, outline the timeline of your work for them. Make sure they understand exactly how long they can plan to wait on you.

Exceeding Customer Expectations

A home’s heating and air conditioning systems are among the most important parts, and consequently, homeowners prefer to hire only the best to keep their units maintained. In addition to exceeding customer expectations regarding your service and skill level, make sure you can meet their preferences regarding customer service as well. Your growing client base will appreciate your effort!

Connect with us to learn more about building an HVAC business after graduation.