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Different Types of HVAC Units

Different Types of HVAC Units

Different Types of HVAC Units

You might not have given the types of HVAC units available much thought when installing one in your home. However, each unit has its own benefits and drawbacks. If you plan on installing an HVAC unit, it is worth taking a second look at the four basic types of HVAC units available. 

Heating and Cooling Split Systems

Heating and Cooling Split Systems are the most common types of HVAC systems. The system is split between two main units, one for heating and one for cooling. Hence the name “split system.”

These units contain both an indoor and outdoor component. Do you know that large box you see blowing out air on the side of homes? That is the outdoor piece, also known as the condensing unit. This cooling system outside using refrigerant, compressors, and coils to cool air, and a fan to blow out hot air.

This system uses a traditional thermostat to manage the temperature. Because of this, the system is able to keep most houses at a desirable temperature. These systems are most widely used because they are most generally applicable. These units do not require any specific needs or environmental factors. This makes them perfect for most homes.

Hybrid Split System

A hybrid system is similar to the split system, but with some key differences. These systems are on the rise due to their ability to mitigate energy costs through their electric hybrid heating system. This differentiates them from other types of HVAC systems.

The ability to switch between gas power to electric power allows homeowners to decide how they want to heat their homes. Gas power is much quicker and more complete than electric, but electric power is more efficient and quieter. This system uses traditional ducts, as well as thermostats, and provides all the benefits of a split system, but with the added option to conserve energy. Plus, these units can lessen utility bills.

Duct Free

A duct-free system, also known as a mini-split system, provides big benefits for certain needs. However, these systems typically have large upfront costs. These HVAC units are individual units in each room. These units are perfect for new additions to homes, such as garages, additions, or additional buildings, because it is easier to install. Plus, this system allows independent control over each unit. These types of HVAC units are also beneficial for service businesses such as hotels or venues, allowing tenants to control individual temperatures. 

Another benefit is energy conservation since individual rooms that are being used are being heated, it keeps exterior or unused rooms from wasting energy. The small size of a ductless cooling system and its zoning capabilities allows for greater energy efficiency.

Despite the benefits, these systems require regular and intensive cleaning and maintenance. This is important to keep up with as the cost of total repairs and replacements are quite expensive. 

Packaged Heating and Air

Packaged heating and air is the most niche unit. This system is typically stored within the house and is usually kept in an attic or top storage place. It serves to both cool and heat a home.

Its compact size makes it useful for smaller spaces or houses. Its size allows it to be placed within the home if the exterior is not an option. Despite its size, this type of unit is able to be very efficient and easily maintained. These units are typically used in warmer climates since the heating element is not as strong as other systems. 

There are many types of heating and cooling systems, but now we hope you are a little more prepared to make a decision. These types of systems are just a fraction of the things you will learn about during your time here at the Training Center of Air Conditioning & Heating in Houston, Texas. If you or someone you know is interested in signing up for classes, please feel free to contact us so we can chat about available options.

HVAC Technicians Can’t Rely On “Beer Can Cold”

HVAC Technicians Can’t Rely On “Beer Can Cold”

If you have spent any time around HVAC, either in a classroom or just chatting up an HVAC technician, there is a decent chance you’ve heard the expression “beer can cold.” “Beer can cold” is an expression that originated in the early days of air conditioning, back in the ‘50s and ‘60s. It was created to describe the temperature at which an air conditioning system has been properly charged with refrigerant. 

The idea is if you were to grab a properly charged suction line it would be as cold as a cold beer can. It is also a completely irrelevant, incorrect, and outdated expression that shouldn’t be applied anywhere near modern-day HVAC. In fact, if you ever hear a fellow HVAC technician using that term earnestly turn the other direction and run away.

“Beer can cold” is an expression that no longer holds any relevance for HVAC technicians and should be left in the past. If you are an HVAC technician or in training to become one, here are three reasons to forget everything you may know about “beer can cold.”  

What is “beer can cold” anyway?

One of the biggest arguments against “beer can cold” is that in a very precise industry this kind of measurement is not even remotely precise. What is the exact temperature of “beer can cold?” You can technically drink beer at any range of cold temperatures and different folks may have a different take on what the ideal temperature of a cold beer is. 

Also, a beer out of a cooler full of ice maybe 32 degrees and one out of the fridge maybe 35 to 38 degrees, but they feel relatively the same to the touch. Air conditioners today are manufactured with distinct specifications on charging temperatures, and the tools HVAC technicians have at our disposal today make taking accurate temperatures much simpler than relying on getting a relative temperature by hand.    

“Beer can cold” is misleading

Extremely hot working conditions are very common for HVAC technicians, especially here in Houston. If you were to grab a suction line that is about 50 degrees on a 100-degree day outside, that suction line is going to feel extraordinarily cold even though it is only 50 degrees. Now, if you grab that same suction line when it is only 60 degrees outside, it is not going to feel anywhere near as cold. Also, if there is a lot of moisture in the air, the suction line will be wet and feel colder than a dry line at the same temperature.

Aside from not having an exact reading for “beer can cold,” taking a temperature by hand can lead to horribly inaccurate and misleading readings that can lead to serious errors during installation and repair. Using this method on the job will likely cause you to make serious mistakes.

It’s not the ‘50s anymore

The truth about “Beer can cold” is that even though it is an expression that began in the ‘50s, it was an outdated expression even back then. So much about air conditioning in the past 60 years. Back then, compressors were oversized, coils had a lot of extra space, and fan motors were higher in horsepower. Flexibility in the charging of refrigerants was not a significant issue since a pound over or under would not cause any drastic changes.

Today’s air conditioning units are built much differently. Units are built to be just big enough, their coils are not oversized and their compressors are barely large enough. This all makes the efficiency rating of units higher, but also means the charge of refrigerant has to be within 2 ounces of the correct amount. Unlike the old days, air conditioners require a much higher level of precision. 

The mantra of “beer can cold” is not only outdated, it was truthfully never a helpful or accurate reading to begin with. Here at the Training Center of Heating and Air Conditioning, we teach our students how to use the advanced techniques and tools at their disposal to do the job and charge the air conditioners they work on the right way, leaving “beer can cool” where it belongs: In your hands after a hard day’s work and you are relaxing at home in your hammock.

Learn more about enrolling in upcoming classes at the Training Center of Heating and Air Conditioning here.

4 Things HVAC Technicians Get Wrong During AC Installation

4 Things HVAC Technicians Get Wrong During AC Installation

Being an HVAC technician involves a lot of very technical and precise work, particularly when it comes to AC installation. This is why a proper education and training is so important for a long and successful career in the industry. 

Unfortunately, not all technicians get things right during AC installations. In fact, there are a few practices that HVAC technicians actually get wrong more often than not. Why is that? It could be many things from displacency to simply not receiving proper education.

So, why is it important to talk about the shortcomings of AC technicians? In such a precise field that so many people rely on for their important service, these shortcomings are unacceptable. For those that are considering pursuing a career as a certified HVAC technician it is just as important to know the wrong way as the right way. 

As an HVAC professional, you want to strive to provide the best care and service to your customers that depend on you to stay safe and cool. Knowing where others in the industry fall short can help you know where you can avoid the same pitfalls and become a more successful AC technician. 

Keep in mind these common mistakes that HVAC technicians make during AC installation. You’ll notice the biggest pattern that emerges from these improper installation missteps is that they each can have serious negative impacts on the performance, efficiency, and lifespan of the air conditioning unit.

70% of technicians don’t follow proper vacuum procedures

One of the most important things technicians ignore not following proper AC vacuum procedures during installation. Vacuuming is important because it helps remove any excess moisture left within the system. Over time, moisture build up can cause long term damage from poor performance, corrosion, and even freezing with the AC system. Never skip this important step in the post-installation process. 

70% of technicians don’t adjust for proper air flow

Ensuring an air conditioner has been adjusted for proper air flow ensures that it can efficiently and easily keep in-home air cool and comfortable for the customer. Proper air flow lets air more easily reach all the nooks and crannies, ensuring no random hot spots. When not adjusted properly, the system has a harder time performing and has to put in extra effort to keep the home cool, which not only can shoot up a customer’s utility bill but also causes AC’s to burn out faster than they should.

70% of technicians don’t charge unit per manufacturer recommendations

Correctly charging your customer’s AC system will ensure there is proper refrigeration to pull out hot air and keep their home cool. However, despite the fact that most manufacturers provide step-by-step instructions and offer their best practice recommendations, this correctly charging units often gets overlooked. The result is either an undercharged unit that can’t keep up with the heat and overwork itself or an overcharged unit that is loud and draws far more energy than it needs to.

90% of air conditioning installations are incorrect

Since these three steps during AC installations are so important, it may not be surprising to hear that more installations are done incorrectly than not. But, for an industry that prides itself on hard workers and providing a necessary service to its customers, this is a number that simply cannot continue to last.

Here at the Training Center for Air Conditioning and Heating, we are attempting to lower the statistics through a comprehensive training and education program for the next generation of HVAC technicians. The course is designed to teach students the skills and techniques required for entry-level employment into the residential and light commercial heating ventilating and air conditioning so that they can not just install and repair heating and cooling systems, but do it the right way to better serve their customers and help make them a more successful professional.

Interested in enrolling in an upcoming class? Learn more about how to join here.